Train chaos LATEST: Train strikes to PLUNGE Brits ‘into limbo’ with 1 in 5 services SCRAPPED; plus live flight updates


BRITS are warned to only travel by train unless absolutely necessary tomorrow as thousands of workers go on strike.

Some 40,000 workers under Network Rail plan to ditch their stations on Wednesday, alongside 14 operators, it has been reported.

Only 20 per cent of train services will run on Wednesday, therefore Brits have been urged to avoid travel at all costs on this day.

This could cause disruptions for the Women’s Euro 2022 semi-final, which is being held in Milton Keynes.

Simultaneous walkouts and chaos will cripple Britain’s transport infrastructure during the first official week of summer holidays for most schools.

Traffic jams swamped the Eurotunnel car terminal in Folkestone, Kent, after part of the M20 was shut to park 600 lorries.

It was a knock-on from the nightmare that gripped the Port of Dover on Friday and Saturday — with ferries struggling to clear the freight backlog.

Ferry operator DFDS told Dover passengers that there were “queues of around an hour” for French border checks this morning as they issued travel advice.

They advised passengers to “allow a minimum of 120 minutes before your departure to complete all controls” amid reports queues had eased.

In a further blow to Brits, Ryanair will also strike this week.

Read our travel delays live blog below for the latest news & updates…

  • Transport for London reviewing long-term funding settlement

    Transport for London (TfL) says it is reviewing a draft proposal from the Government for a long-term funding settlement.

    TfL has been operating on a series of emergency short-term funding deals since falling into financial trouble during the pandemic.

    Andy Byford, London’s Transport Commissioner, said the long-term funding – if agreed – would provide much-needed certainty for those in the nation’s capital.

    He said: “Since keeping London moving through the darkest periods of the pandemic we have been making the case to Government that there can be no UK recovery without a London recovery and that there can be no London recovery without a properly funded transport network.

    “We are grateful for the support we have received so far, and maintain we have met every condition that has been set by Government as we have worked towards agreeing a multi-year funding settlement that would give certainty to London and to the tens of thousands of jobs across the country that are directly linked to TfL.”

  • What to expect on Thursday after the train strikes

    • Most services will run as normal
    • Services affected by the strike on Wednesday will operate a minimal service before 08:00 and restore a normal service by midday. These include:
      • London Overground
      • The Elizabeth line
      • District line – Wimbledon and Richmond branches
  • Strike date round-up

    The National Union of Rail, Maritime and Transport Workers (RMT) and Transport Salaried Staffs’ Association – July 27

    Arriva Rail London, Chiltern Railways, Greater Anglia, Great Western, Hull Trains, LNER, Southeastern and West Midlands Trains – July 30

    RMT – August 18 and 20

  • How do you cancel an easyJet flight?

    To cancel an easyJet flight, you need to go to the easyJet website.

    Go to the Manage Bookings section and use your surname and booking reference to log in, and then choose the flight reservation you wish to cancel and click “Cancel”.

    If you are asked to pay a cancellation fee, you can do so by entering your card payment details – and your flight should now be cancelled.

    Alternatively, customers can call the easyJet customer service team on 0330 365 5000.

    You can also cancel flights at an easyJet Help Desk at most airports – but this must be under two hours before take-off.

    If your flight is cancelled due to a coronavirus travel ban or the Foreign Office advises against travel to your destination, you will be fully refunded.

    But if you choose not to fly due to personal safety concerns and the flight does go ahead, you are not entitled to your money back.

  • ‘We should actually be talking about pay increases’

    Martin Chalk, Balpa general secretary, said: “We are in talks with British Airways and wish to persuade them that continuing deductions from our members’ pay is unwarranted.

    “We should actually be talking about pay increases given the inflationary scenario.

    “Unless BA is prepared to walk with us down that road then we will have to consult with members to consider our next actions.”

  • Holidaymakers face huge queues at Manchester and Bristol airports

    HUNDREDS of travellers faced lengthy queues at Manchester and Bristol airports yesterday.

    And more misery is possible as British Airways pilots threaten strikes over pay.

    BA pilots were considering a ballot on strike action last night after bosses rejected demands for a new pay deal.

    Industrial action could heap more misery on hard-pressed holidaymakers already facing airport delays and cancellations.

    BA pilots agreed to temporary pay cuts in 2020 to avoid mass redundancies during the Covid pandemic, but no end date was agreed.

    The airline endured a devastating two years which saw the business lose more than £4billion. Pilots accepted a five per cent pay reward earlier this year.

    Now pilots’ union Balpa is demanding proper pay rises for its members as BA returns to profitability, saying the airline “seems to ignore you until you issue a [strike] ballot”.

  • Liz Truss vows to limit trade unions’ ability to ‘paralyse the economy’

    Liz Truss has pledged to do “everything in her power” to ensure “militant action” from trade unions can no longer “paralyse” the economy if she wins the Tory leadership contest.

    The Foreign Secretary announced a series of measures aimed at preventing trade unions from causing disruption on strategic rail routes and other national services.

    If she becomes prime minister at the beginning of September, Ms Truss said her government would introduce legislation in the first 30 days of Parliament to guarantee a minimum level of service on vital national infrastructure.

    Tailored minimum thresholds, including staffing levels, would be determined with each industry.

    She would also ensure strike action has significant support from union members by raising the minimum threshold for voting in favour of strike action from 40% to 50%.

    The minimum notice period for strike action would be raised from two weeks to four weeks, and a cooling-off period would be implemented so that unions can no longer strike as many times as they like in the six-month period after a ballot.

    Ms Truss would also put an end to members receiving tax-free payments from trade unions on the days they are on strike.

    She said: “We need tough and decisive action to limit trade unions’ ability to paralyse our economy.

    “I will do everything in my power to make sure that militant action from trade unions can no longer cripple the vital services that hard-working people rely on.”

  • Port of Dover hanging on ‘knife edge’

    Holidaymakers have been warned the Kent port is on a “knife edge” as the country’s travel mayhem entered its third torturous day.

    A “critical incident” was declared at Dover on Friday, with holidaymakers told to arrive six hours early for ferry queues lasting up to five hours.

    A ramp up of post-Brexit border checks and French authorities’ understaffing checkpoints have been blamed for the hold-ups.

    Local authorities have now urged ministers to handle the issue as a “national problem” instead of the “sticking plaster” approach.

  • Brits queue for hours at UK airports – just as school holidays start

    Almost a million holidaymakers were expected to leave the UK on flights this weekend.

    Long queues could be seen at Heathrow and Bristol airports. 

    And Manchester and Stansted also struggled with an influx of arrivals. 

    Social media was awash with complaints of lost luggage not being recovered. 

    One holidaymaker at Manchester told us: “We were packed in like sardines. It was mayhem.”

    Click here to read more.

  • Little-known Universal Credit rule could see you fly home from holiday EARLY

    Sun seekers are jetting off on their jollies despite the travel chaos, but this mistake could see your benefit payments cut or stopped all together.

    If you’re planning on going abroad for any length of time you must tell the Department for Work and Pensions about your plans.

    If you don’t report this, you could see your claim stopped or reduced, and you might have to cut your holiday short.

    You can go for a holiday for up to a month – but you still need to stick to the conditions of your claim, which involves looking for a job.

    How you report a change in your personal circumstances depends on what benefit you are claiming.

    Click here to read more.

  • More queues at Dover as fears of ‘vulnerable summer’ grow

    Queues are building at the Port of Dover amid fears that the severe disruption seen in recent days could return to Kent throughout the summer.

    Ferry operator DFDS told passengers that there were “queues of around an hour” for French border checks on Monday morning, and to “allow a minimum of 120 minutes before your departure to complete all controls”.

    P&O Ferries wrote on Twitter: “The queues have picked up and it is taking approximately one hour to clear passport control.”

    Passengers were forced to wait for several hours on Friday as bumper-to-bumper traffic stretching for miles marred the journeys of tens of thousands of families at the start of the school summer holidays.

    This was blamed on a staffing shortage at French border control and a serious crash on the M20 motorway.

  • AA warns travel chaos to jam Britain’s roads during warm months

    Head of roads policy at the AA Jack Cousens shared his worries that delays will last throughout the warm months.

    He explained: “We are concerned that we could be in for a repeat of this congestion across the summer.

    “Drivers due to use both Dover and Folkestone to head into Europe on Fridays, Saturdays and Sunday mornings between now and the reopening of schools may see a repetition of these delays.”

  • New rail map shows only half of services will run this week

    RAIL bosses have unveiled a new map of misery showing how only half of Britain’s network will be open this week.

    More than 50,000 railway staff will walkout in the biggest dispute on the network in 33 years.

    A map shows the lines which will continue operating in and out of London during the affected dates.

  • More queues at Dover as fears of ‘vulnerable summer’ grow

    Queues are building at the Port of Dover amid fears that the severe disruption seen in recent days could return to Kent throughout the summer.

    Ferry operator DFDS told passengers that there were “queues of around an hour” for French border checks on Monday morning, and to “allow a minimum of 120 minutes before your departure to complete all controls”.

    P&O Ferries wrote on Twitter: “The queues have picked up and it is taking approximately one hour to clear passport control.”

    Passengers were forced to wait for several hours on Friday as bumper-to-bumper traffic stretching for miles marred the journeys of tens of thousands of families at the start of the school summer holidays.

    This was blamed on a staffing shortage at French border control and a serious crash on the M20 motorway.

  • Passengers in Folkestone ‘treated worse than cattle’

    Passengers at Folkestone said they were “treated worse than cattle” while stuck in their cars for up to 21 hours this weekend.

    The gridlock was blamed on the decision to shut a 24-mile stretch of the M20 due to Operation Brock.

    Kent Police effectively turned the roads into a car park for thousands of lorries in an attempt to ease congestion – which seems to have backfired.

    The AA branded the entrance to the Eurotunnel in Folkestone the “hotspot of holiday hell”, warning drivers to “be prepared”.





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